(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A brief introduction to the museum's facilities"

Cooper-Hewitt Museum Library 




Smitlisonian Institution Libraries 



b 



Coop'^'T U •) 



I ' : L. 



THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM 
FOR THE ARTS OF DECORATION 



A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO 
THE MUSEUM'S FACILITIES 



COOPER SQUARE and SEVENTH STREET 

NEW YORK 



* 


LIBRARY OF THE 
COOPER-HEWITT MUSEUM OF DESIGN 

. SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION • 


^ 


* 




it^ 



Mid 

y, -r .^ r-^ ,.-.. ^ ^ 



^ A 




GALLERY OF DRAWINGS BY AMERICAN ARTISTS 



Established primarily to aid tire desigrrer. the artisan, 
and the student of the decorative arts, the Museum has assembled 
collections of remarkable richness and diversity, which appeal as 
^vell to the more general interests of a wider public. Its treasures, 
many of which are not duplicated in public collections elsewhere 
in the United States, are compactly arranged in convenient display 
groupings, supplemented by readily available study material. In 
addition to the expected objects of decorative design, there is a 
representation of drawings and paintings, with emphasis on French 
work of the eighteenth century, and American of the nineteenth, 
and a comprehensive collection of engravings and etchings ranging 
in date from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. 

Besides actual objects of art, the Museum offers a valuable 
source of information in its library facilities. There are three 
libraries: one devoted to books of reference published mainly dur- 
ing the past century; another containing older and rarer books of 
fine and applied arts; as well as the richest collection of designs by 




STAGE DESIGNS DISPLAYED IN SWINGING FRAMES 



French ornemanistes to be found in this country; and the third 
library a collection of nearly a half-million photographs and illus- 
trations, classified and mounted in encyclopaedic scrap-books. 

In operation the Museum aims to present its material with 
directness and informality, realizing that its comparative smallness 
of area is a fortunate contribution to economy of time and effort. 
The visitor has immediate access to the collections, and can have 
material assembled in advance of his visit, if it be desired, merely 
by requesting this service. The staff, familiar with the collections 
and with the types of information that are in demand, is prepared 
to assist with problems of design and decoration. 

The accompanying photographs show some of the facilities that 
the Museum offers. For those who are unfamiliar with the collec- 
tions, a list of their most important categories is given: 

AMERICAN ARTISTS' WORK: Drawings, paintings and prints by Alex- 
ander, Beckwith, Blum, Chase, Church, Cox, Durand, Hassam, Homer, 
Huntington, Moran, Sully, Trumbull, West and others 




THE ENCYCLOPAEDIC PICTURE REFERENCE LIBRARY 



ARCHITECTURAL DECORATION: Examples of painted architectural 

enrichment, carved stone and wood details 
BIRD CAGES: The Alexander Wilson Drake Collection of one hundred 

oriental, European and American examples 
BUTTONS: More than five thousand items, civil and military, covering a 

wide range of materials and of present and past styles 
COSTUME ACCESSORIES: A rich collection, largely of Western origin. 

with some oriental material; newly-received group of infants' wear 
DECORATIVE PAINTING: Documentary material from Italy and France, 

Renaissance to Third Republic 
DESIGNS: Original designs for architecture, ceramics, embroidery, furniture, 

hardware, lighting, jewelry, porcelain, silversmith's work, stage decoration, 

textiles, and other subjects by celebrated artists of today and the past 
DRAWINGS: By Americans, as listed above, and by such European artists as 

Boucher, Oudry, Le Prince, Robert, Tiepolo, Watteau, and others only 

slightly less illustrious 
EMBROIDERY: European and oriental secular and ecclesiastical embroid- 
ery; analytical study cards demonstrating the resources of the art 
ENGRAVING AND ETCHING: Prints by the Masters, from Mantegna to 

Picasso. Four thousand engraved portraits of Americans; ornament prints; 

topographic prints 




SOME OF THE EARGER EXAMIM.ES OE 1 1 AND-EOONF EABRU ' 



FLOWERS: Flower prints; illustrated books of botany and horticulture; 
garden design 

FURNITURE: Type pieces of European and American origin. Large range 
of variations in chair design 

GLASS: Vessels of blown and pressed glass. Stained and painted glass win- 
dows, including work by La Farge 

JAPANESE SWORD MOUNTINGS: The George Cameron Stone Collec- 
tion of sword furnishings, of full range of type and period 

JEWELRY: Large loan collection of European jewelry of the nineteenth 
century 

LACE: Display collection of first quality, supplemented by study cards and 
diagrammatic charts of techniques 

METALWORK: European wrought iron, American cast iron, in gates, rail- 
ings, windows and brackets; silversmith's work 

PORCELAIN AND POTTERY: Ceramic wares from Chinese and Euro- 
pean sources, including rare early examples 

STRAW-WORK: Boxes and cases covered with marquetry designs of colored 
straw, representing one of many crafts of the past which offer suggestions 
to the designer of the present 




^VALL-PAPER ALCOVE 



TEXTILES: One of the most distinguished collections in the country, reach- 
ing from 1500 B.C. to current production; hand-loom fabrics; painted silks; 
printed cottons, including early American examples; collection of materials 
illustrating textile design and production 

TILES: Spanish, Dutch and English tiles, and a remarkable room of Delft 
tiles of the seventeenth centviry; pottery stoves and braziers 

TOLE: Vessels and other objects of painted metal 

TOYS AND GAMES: Puppets, including shadow puppets from the Theatre 
Seraphin; dolls, miniature objects; playing cards; the giuoco di luce 

WALL-PAPER AND BANDBOXES: Large and comprehensive collection of 
French, English and American papers, and valuable assortment of Ameri- 
can paper-covered bandboxes 

WOODWORK: Carved panels and architectural details of the eighteenth 
century in France; details of cabinet-work 

To all designers and students this announcement is directed, 
reminding them that the Museum has given service for over forty 
years, and with enlarged collections is now a more useful tool than 
ever. Frequent exhibitions of special themes are a further source 
of ideas and inspiration. 



THE COOPER UNION MUSEUM 

HOURS 

October Through April 

Weekdays except Saturday, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. 
Saturdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

May Through September 

Weekdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Closed Saturdays during July and August 

Telephone: ALgonquin 4-6300 

LINES OF TRANSPORTATION 

SECOND AVENUE ELEVATED 8th Street (St. Mark's Place) Station 

THIRD AVENUE ELEVATED 9th Street Station 

B.-M. T. SUBWAY Broadway-Seventh Avenue Line — 8th Street Station 

L R. T. SUBWAY Lexington-Fourth Avenue Line — Astor Place Station 

INDEPENDENT SUBWAY West 4th Street — Washington Square Station 
HUDSON-MANHATTAN TUBES gth Street Station 

FIFTH AVENUE BUS Wanamaker Terminal. Route 5 

BROADWAY BUS LEXINGTON AVENUE BUS, Route 4 

MADISON-FOURTH AVENUE BUS Routes 1 and 2 

EIGHTH-NINTH STREET CROSSTOWN BUS 

Christopher Street Ferry Route, 13; Seventh Avenue Route, 9